Seleccionar página

Un Viaje Musical por la Europa de las Luces

8,00


Un viaje musical por la Europa de las Luces

A musical journey through the Europe of Lights

Trios and Quartets by F. Devienne, J.C.F. Bach, T. Giordani and J.F. Tapray.

Ensemble Carmen Veneris

Ana López Suero, Traverso.
Pablo Almazán Jaén, Viola barroca.
Guillermo Martín Gámiz, Violonchelo barroco.
Jordan Fumadó Jornet, Clave.

Content

François Devienne (1759 – 1803)

Sonata en “Quatour” para Clave y acompañamiento de Flauta, Viola y Violonchelo.

  • 1. Allegro 8’46
  • 2. Adagio 4’09
  • 3. Rondo Moderato 4’49
Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732 – 1795)

Sonata en Mi menor para Flauta, Viola y Continuo.

  • 4. Allegro Spiritoso 5’38
  • 5. Andante 4’46
  • 6. Allegretto 5’25
Tommaso Giordani (1730-1806)

Sonata para Clave y acompañamiento obligado de Flauta y Viola.

  • 7. Allegro 6’37
  • 8. Largo 4’16
  • 9. Minuetto Affettuoso 3’57
Jean-François Tapray (1738 – 1798)

Cuarteto Nº 6, Op. 19 para Clave con acompañamiento de Flauta, Viola y Violoncello.

  • 10. Allegro Moderato 11’59
  • 11. Allegro Assai 5’38

Ensemble Carmen Veneris

Ana López Suero, Traverso (Giovanni Tardino 2007, réplica de Xuriach circa 1750).

Pablo Almazán Jaén, Viola barroca (Mario Gadda, Face in Mantova, Anno 1947).

Guillermo Martín Gámiz, Violonchelo barroco (Robert Sourzac, 2004. D’après Antonio Stradivarius “le Christian”).

Jordan Fumadó Jornet, Clave (Modelo franco-flamenco de Marc Ducornet, París, 1999).

Email

Descripción

Un Viaje Musical por la Europa de las Luces

Trios and Quartets by F. Devienne, J.C.F. Bach, T. Giordani and J.F. Tapray.

François Devienne (1759 – 1803) wrote the Sonata en Quatour pour Le Clavecin ou Le Pianoforte avec Accompagnment de Flûte, Cor et Alto Obliges (Il y a une partie de violincelle pour remplacer le cor)… in Paris in 1789 whilst presenting his services as a Bassoonist to Cardinal de Rohan in the Théâtre de Monsieur. The work of this Frenchman, whose opera “Les Vistandines” would be performed more than two hundred times between 1792 and 1797, has marked an important milestone in the repertoire of the flute. The appeal of his work comes from the great variety of textures used; vigorous tones which give his style of harmony a typically exclusive Frenchness; moments of tranquillity and an elegiac atmosphere in which his accompaniment is always impeccably diversified, sometimes light and at other times sophisticated and brilliant. The virtuosity of these pieces is a constant dialogue among the instruments, creating for each musician all kinds of expressive passages, bold yet carefully shared.

The music of Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732-1795), the second youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach, symbolizes the bridge between two eras. His production includes almost all kinds of instrumental forms and vocals, from chamber music to symphony with oratorio and motete in between. It originates from the Baroque tradition inherited from his family but later embraces the style of the Italian current, promoted especially in the residence of Count Wilhelm de Schaumburg-Lippe at Bückeburg. Later he was imbued with the empfindsamkeit (sensitivity) of his elder brother Carl Philipp Emmanuel and finally, after a visit to London in 1778, his music follows the trend set by his younger brother Johann Christian and the maestros of that moment, Haydn and Mozart. This Triosanata in E minor is preserved in parts of manuscripts held in the Staatsbibliothek Pruessischer Kulturbesitz in Berlin. The title of the first page has the following inscription: “Sonata/per il/Flauto Traverso/Viola é/Basso/di Bach (followed by an incipit of the first four bars in the flute part of the beginning of the first movement)/pour/L.M.” Someone else has written “Em” before Bach and, in pencil, “nicht bei Wotquenne” has been added. The manuscript paper for the parts of the Flauto Traverso and the Viola has the watermark of a heraldic lily on one half and the initials “SHC” on the other. The initials correspond to Simon Heinreich Clasing, a master papermaker who worked in the Arensburg factory between 1742 and 1763. Many examples of this same paper from the court of Bückeburg demonstrate its use from the beginning of the 17th Century onwards. The watermarks on the parts of the Flauto Traverso and the Viola are identical to the autograph of JCF Bach from the Oratorio “Die Auferweckung des Lazarus (1773)” preserved in the same institution as this Triosonata. The simple reference to “Bach” as the composer can only refer to a member of his family working for the court of Bückeburg during the second half of the 18th Century; any other composer would have been identified by their whole name.

The first and third movements of this sonata owe an unmistakable tribute of gratitude to the chamber works of CPE Bach. In fact, the theme of the first movement can be found in a similar form in the movement which opens the triosonata in G major for flute and violin, continuing on in Wq. 150; and the theme of the final movement appears in the second movement of another trio for the same formation also in G Major, Wq. 144.

Tommaso Giordani was born in Naples in 1730. He was the son of an Italian businessman, singer and librettist and spent the early years of his life travelling all around Europe with his family (the founding members of a small opera company), arriving in England, probably, in 1753. There his family performed at Covent Garden where, on 12 January 1756, Tommaso’s first opera made its debut. The family then moved to Dublin but Tommaso returned to London where he established himself as a composer of opera, oratorios and instrumental chamber music. Written in the Galant Style then in vogue, his music became immensely popular with the public. Giordani spent his final years in Dublin where he eventually died at the end of February 1806.

The collection “Three Sonatas for the Pianoforte or Harpsichord with obligato accompaniments for the Flute or Violin and Viola de Gamba or Tenor composed and most humbly dedicated to the Right Honourable Lady Viscountess Althorp by Tommaso Giordani Op XXX” was published in London in 1782.

Practically all the work of Jean-François Tapray (1738 – 1798) is for the forte-piano and harpsichord, covering the transition period from one to another. He, like most of his contemporaries in Paris, made no significant distinction in style between the two instruments and it is, therefore, pointless to compare his sonatas for the harpsichord with those that include “forte-piano” in their title. The keyboard is usually an accompanying part and almost always introduces the theme, not allowing a significant division of the music by categories. The almost impromptu material of charming melodic ideas on top of figurative but minimally developed accompaniments and the use of simple modulations was very much appreciated in France but found little favour in Germany, especially after the appearance of the latest works by Mozart. Tapray, perhaps recognising the need to create interest in the harmonic aspect and in the monotony of the bass, uses unusual timbres in many of his works (the “peau de buffle” effect in op.21; harpsichord, violin and forte-piano as soloists in op.9; clarinet or flute in place of the usual violin and the bassoon in place of the cello in op.18-20).

Ana López Suero

Información adicional

Artista

Carmen Veneris

Estilo

Barroco Florido

Interpretación

Música de Cámara

También te recomendamos…

Un Viaje Musical por la Europa de las Luces

8,00


Un viaje musical por la Europa de las Luces

Tríos y Cuartetos de F. Devienne, J.C.F. Bach, T. Giordani y J.F. Tapray.

Ensemble Carmen Veneris

Ana López Suero, Traverso.
Pablo Almazán Jaén, Viola barroca.
Guillermo Martín Gámiz, Violonchelo barroco.
Jordan Fumadó Jornet, Clave.

Contenido

François Devienne (1759 – 1803)

Sonata en “Quatour” para Clave y acompañamiento de Flauta, Viola y Violonchelo.

  • 1. Allegro 8’46
  • 2. Adagio 4’09
  • 3. Rondo Moderato 4’49
Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732 – 1795)

Sonata en Mi menor para Flauta, Viola y Continuo.

  • 4. Allegro Spiritoso 5’38
  • 5. Andante 4’46
  • 6. Allegretto 5’25
Tommaso Giordani (1730-1806)

Sonata para Clave y acompañamiento obligado de Flauta y Viola.

  • 7. Allegro 6’37
  • 8. Largo 4’16
  • 9. Minuetto Affettuoso 3’57
Jean-François Tapray (1738 – 1798)

Cuarteto Nº 6, Op. 19 para Clave con acompañamiento de Flauta, Viola y Violoncello.

  • 10. Allegro Moderato 11’59
  • 11. Allegro Assai 5’38

Ensemble Carmen Veneris

Ana López Suero, Traverso (Giovanni Tardino 2007, réplica de Xuriach circa 1750).

Pablo Almazán Jaén, Viola barroca (Mario Gadda, Face in Mantova, Anno 1947).

Guillermo Martín Gámiz, Violonchelo barroco (Robert Sourzac, 2004. D’après Antonio Stradivarius “le Christian”).

Jordan Fumadó Jornet, Clave (Modelo franco-flamenco de Marc Ducornet, París, 1999).

Email
SKU: MPC-0122 Categorías: , ,

Descripción

Un Viaje Musical por la Europa de las Luces

Tríos y Cuartetos de F. Devienne, J.C.F. Bach, T. Giordani y J.F. Tapray

François Devienne (1759 – 1803) escribió la Sonate En Quatour Pour Le Clavecin Ou Le Pianoforte Avec Accompagnement De Flûte, Cor Et Alto Obliges (Il y a une partie de violoncelle pour remplacer le cor)… en París en 1789 mientras prestaba sus servicios como fagotista al Cardenal de Rohan en el Théâtre de Monsieur. La obra de este francés cuya ópera Les Visitandines se interpretaría más de doscientas veces entre 1792 y 1797, ha marcado un hito fundamental en el repertorio de la flauta.
El atractivo de sus obras viene a menudo dado por la gran variedad de texturas; vigorosos unísonos que imprimen a su estilo concertante un típico pero exclusivo estilo francés, momentos de tranquilidad y atmósfera elegíaca en los que el acompañamiento está siempre diversificado de manera impecable, unas veces ligero y otras sofisticado y brillante. El virtuosismo de estas piezas es constante en el diálogo entre los instrumentos, planteando a cada músico toda clase de pasajes expresivos y a la vez atrevidos, cuidadosamente repartidos.

La música de Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732 – 1795), el penúltimo hijo de Johann Sebastian Bach, sirvió hasta cierto punto como figura puente entre dos épocas. Su producción, que comprende casi todas las formas instrumentales y vocales desde la música de cámara a la sinfonía, pasando por el oratorio y el motete, tiene una clara raiz en la tradición barroca hereditada de su familia, pero abraza posteriormente el estilo de la corriente italianizante fomentada especialmente en la residencia de Bückeburg del Conde Wilhelm de Schaumburg-Lippe. Más tarde se imbuirá también del empfindsamkeit (sensibilidad) de su hermano mayor Carl Philipp Emmanuel y finalmente tras una visita a Londres en 1778, su música seguirá la tendencia marcada por su hermano menor, Johann Christian y los maestros del momento, Haydn y Mozart.
La presente Triosonata en Mi menor se conserva en forma de partes manuscritas en la Staatsbibliothek Pruessischer Kulturbesitz de Berlin. El título de la primera página lleva la siguiente inscripción: Sonata / per il / Flauto Traverso / Viola é / Basso. / di Bach. / (seguido de un incipit de los primeros cuatro compases en la parte de flauta en el comienzo del primer movimiento) / pour / L. M. Una mano distinta ha insertado “Em:” antes de “Bach” y, en lápiz, alguien ha añadido “nicht bei Wotquenne”.
El papel del manuscrito tiene la filigrana de una lila heráldica en una mitad y las iniciales SHC en la otra, en el caso de las partes de Flauto Traverso y Viola. Dichas iniciales corresponden a Simon Heinrich Clasing, un maestro fabricante de papel activo en la factoría de Arensburg entre 1742 y 1763. Numerosos ejemplos de este mismo papel en la corte de Bückeburg demuestran su uso desde principios del siglo XVII en adelante.

Las marcas de agua en las partes de Flauto Traverso y Viola son idénticas a la del autógrafo de J. C.F. Bach del Oratorio Die Auferweckung des Lazarus (1773), conservado en la misma institución que esta Triosonata. La simple referencia a “Bach” como compositor sólo puede referirse al miembro de la familia activo en la Corte de Bückeburg durante la segunda mitad del siglo XVIII; cualquier otro hubiera sido identificado con el nombre completo. Los movimientos primero y tercero de la presente sonata deben un inequívoco tributo de gratitud a obras de cámara de C. P. E. Bach. De hecho, el tema del primer movimiento puede encontrarse, en forma similar, en el movimiento que abre la triosonata en sol mayor para flauta, violín y continuo Wq. 150, y el tema del movimiento final aparece en el segundo de otro trio para la misma formación, también en Sol Mayor, Wq. 144.

Tommaso Giordani nació en Nápoles en 1730. Hijo de un empresario, cantante y libretista italiano, pasó los primeros años de su vida viajando por toda Europa junto a su familia (núcleo fundador de una pequeña compañía de ópera), hasta llegar a Inglaterra probablemente en 1753. Allí la familia actuaría en el Covent Garden, donde la primera ópera mencionada de Tommaso fue estrenada el 12 de enero de 1756. La familia se trasladó posteriormente a Dublín y Tommaso volvió a Londres, donde se estableció como compositor de ópera, oratorio y música de cámara instrumental. Escrita en el estilo galante entonces en voga, su música disfrutó de una inmensa popularidad entre el público. Giordani regresó en sus últimos años a Dublín, donde falleció a finales de Febrero de 1806.
La colección de Three Sonatas / for the / Forte- Piano or Harpsichord / with obligato Accompaniments for the / Flute or Violin / and / Viola de Gamba or Tenor / composed / and / most humbly Dedicated to the Right Honorable / Lady Viscountess Althorp / by / Tommaso Giordano / Op. XXX” fue publicada en Londres en año 1782.

Prácticamente toda la producción de Jean-François Tapray (1738 – 1798) es para forte-piano y clavecín, abarcando la época de transición de uno al otro Este organista y compositor nacido en Nomeny (Francia) se asentaría en París en 1772 como maestro de clavecín y organista en la Ecole Royale Militaire y durante el tiempo que pasó en esta ciudad actuó como intérprete en la programación de los Concert Spirituel en donde probablemente conoció a W. A. Mozart, alcanzando gran fama como profesor de clavecín y pianoforte antes de su muerte. Él, al igual que la mayoría de sus contemporáneos en París, no hizo ninguna distinción significativa de estilo entre los dos instrumentos y, por tanto, es inútil comparar sus sonatas para clavecín con aquellas que incluyen “forte-piano” en el título. El teclado es parte normalmente acompañada, y casi siempre lleva el material temático, lo que permite una división poco significativa de la música por categorías. El tejido casi improvisatorio de encantadoras ideas melódicas sobre acompañamientos figurativos de mínimo desarrollo y uso de simples modulaciones fue muy apreciado en Francia, pero encontró poco favor en Alemania, sobre todo después de la aparición de los últimos trabajos de Mozart. Tapray, tal vez reconociendo la necesidad de crear interés en el aspecto armónico y en la monotonía del bajo, usa timbres inusuales en muchas obras (el efecto peau de buffle en op.21; clavecín, violín y forte-piano como solistas en op.9; clarinete o flauta en lugar de la habitual violín y fagot en lugar de cello en op.18-20).

Ana López Suero

Información adicional

Estilo

Barroco Florido

Interpretación

Música de Cámara

Artista

Ensemble Carmen Veneris