Seleccionar página

The garden with countless windows

8,00


The garden with countless windows

Voice and Recorders in a Different Light.

ÆroDynamic

Content

01 Johannes Ciconia
Virelai: Sus une fontayne en remirant. (c1370 – 1411) From: Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Canonici Pat. lat. 229, no. 11, fol. 38v.
02 Aspasia Nasopoulou
Rodia=SO2H4 (*1972) Composed in 2003; revised for trio in 2005. Text: Nikos Egonopoulos (1910–1995) “Rodia = SO2H4” (from Τα κλειδοκύμβαλα της σιωπής,Ιππαλεκτρυών, 1939)
03 Guillaume Dufay
Ballade: Resvellies vous et faites chiere lye. (c1397 – 1474) From: Oxford, Bodleian Library, Can. misc., MS 213, fol. 126v.
04 Anonymous
Cantilena: Stella maris illustrans omnia. (England, 2nd half 13th century) From: Cambridge: Gonville and Caius College 334/727, fol. 201r–201v.
 05 Antti Auvinen
Facta (*1974) Composed for ÆroDynamic in 2006. Commission supported by the Finnish Council of Arts (Taideen Keskustoimikunta), Helsinki. Text: Yle1 Nuntii Latini / Reijo Pitkäranta.
06 John Dunstaple
Antiphon: Sub tuam protectionem. (+1473) From: Bologna, Liceo Musicale, Q 15, ff. 283v–284r e.a.
07 Jacopo da Bologna
Madrigal: Sotto l’imperio del possente prinçe. (fl. c1340 – c1360) From: Biblioteca Laurenziana, Florence. MS. Palatino 87 (Squarcialupi Codex), fol. 7v–8r.
08 Katarzyna Arnhold
In the alchemy of the world’s dream (*1968) Composed for ÆroDynamic in 2005 Text: Kathleen Raine (1908–2003) “Change” (from The Presence, 1987), and excerpts from “Three Poems of Incarnation” (from The Year One, 1952). Texts reproduced by permission of The Literary Estate of Kathleen Raine from The Collected Poems of Kathleen Raine, Golgonooza Press, 2000.
09 Leonel Power
Antiphon: Quam pulchra es et quam decora. (+1445) Granada, Capilla Real, Archivo de Música, MS. s.s.
10 John Dunstaple
Antiphon: Quam pulchra es et quam decora. (+1473) Motteta Francisci Guerreri…Venice, Antonius Gardanus, 1570.
11 Elizabeth Gaskill
Balloons (*1950) From the song cycle Colors. Composed for ÆroDynamic in 2010. Text: Edward Estlin Cummings (1894–1962) “In Just-” (originally published in The Dial, Volume LXVIII, No. 5: May 1920).

Total playing time: 59’35’’

Email
SKU: NL-3012 Categorías: , , , Etiquetas: ,

Descripción

The garden with countless windows

ÆroDynamic

Voice and recorders in a different light

The garden with countless windows was, I say, endless… (Nikos Egonopoulos, Rodia=SO2H4)

Change, an unavoidable factor in our lives and those of our predecessors, is a recurrent theme in music and poetry throughout the centuries, and also the thread behind the story told in this record. In Nikos Egonopoulos’s poem Rodia=SO2H4 the poet dreams of a ‘garden with countless windows’: an impossible, ever-changing landscape in which seemingly incompatible stories can connect and interact to form a fascinating narrative. Inspired by this image, ÆroDynamic presents a collection of poetic and musical reflections on change. Change may come in different disguises, be it as a loverʼs contemplation (Sus une fontayne), the description of a terrible disaster (FACTA) or the yearly arrival of spring (Balloons). Change may be wished for when it adds something to our lives, be it honor (Resvellies vous), completeness (Quam pulchra es) or the outmost experience of change as the generation of a new life (In the alchemy of the world’s dream). But change is also feared when it takes the shape of feebleness, death, or confronting the unknown (Sotto l’imperio). Our fragility revealed, we seek supernatural protection to avoid or confront change (Stella maris, Sub tuam protectionem).

Johannes Ciconia (c1370–1412) was born in Liège but probably left his birthplace after his formation as a choir boy and made a career in Northern Italy, mainly Pavia and Padua. Sus une fontayne en remirant [1] is an impressive composition dated around 1390, when the composer was just about 20 years old. This virelai (one of the French standard poetic and musical forms known as formes fixes, with the structure ABBA’A) is an homage to the complex French musical tradition of the ars subtilior and particularly to Philipoctus de Caserta, who probably was Ciconia’s master in Pavia. Ciconia quotes three poetic and musical phrases by Caserta: En remirant, En attendant souffrir and De ma dolour. Rodia=SO2H4 (2004) [2] describes a dream in which love, desire and the subconscious create a surreal landscape. Speech and music fuse in Greek composer’s Aspasia Nasopoulou’s (*1972) lyric approach to this poem. The relatively high setting with an alto and bass recorder evokes a sensual and delicate atmosphere. Visual artist Alexandros Kyrkos recreated the world of Egonopoulos’s dream in a film that can be found on ÆroDynamic’s website. Resvelles vous et faites chiere lye [3] is an early work by Guillaume Dufay (c1397–1474) written to celebrate the marriage of Carlo Malatesta and Vittoria Colonna, which took place in Rimini on July 18th, 1423. Like Ciconia, Dufay pursued a career in Italy and serving at the Malatesta’s court was his first opportunity. He had met Carlo Malatesta during the Concile of Konstanz (1414–1418) and moved to Rimini in 1420.

Stella maris illustrans omnia is a cantilena, one of the oldest English polyphonic forms: a homophonic setting of a Latin text. Many thirteenth-century English cantilenas feature Marian texts, as it is the case in Stella maris, and present a very regular structure with phrases of equal length. The polyphonic double verses were originally intended to alternate with plainchant. The love of English musicians for parallel motion and the extensive use of the third and sixth provide a characteristic sonority, a rich harmonic texture with many triads, and a clear sense of direction toward the final formula of each phrase. English medieval music retained a certain simplicity until the fifteenth century, certainly in comparison with the complexities of the ars subtilior in Italy and France. A large amount of works by fifteenth-century English composers has been preserved in continental manuscripts (mainly in Italy and Germany), being a testimony of the English influence in the creation of a new international style. John Dunstaple might have been the most distinguished of these English composers: Respected not only as a musician, but also as a mathematician and astronomer, he probably travelled through Europe at the service of the Duke of Bedford. Already highly regarded during his life, several music theorists writing up to a century after his death still praised him highly.

Información adicional

Artista

ÆroDynamic

Estilo

Varios estilos

Interpretación

Flutes

También te recomendamos…

The garden with countless windows

8,00


The garden with countless windows

Voice and Recorders in a Different Light.

ÆroDynamic

Contenido

01 Johannes Ciconia
Virelai: Sus une fontayne en remirant. (c1370 – 1411) From: Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Canonici Pat. lat. 229, no. 11, fol. 38v.
02 Aspasia Nasopoulou
Rodia=SO2H4 (*1972) Composed in 2003; revised for trio in 2005. Text: Nikos Egonopoulos (1910–1995) “Rodia = SO2H4” (from Τα κλειδοκύμβαλα της σιωπής,Ιππαλεκτρυών, 1939)
03 Guillaume Dufay
Ballade: Resvellies vous et faites chiere lye. (c1397 – 1474) From: Oxford, Bodleian Library, Can. misc., MS 213, fol. 126v.
04 Anonymous
Cantilena: Stella maris illustrans omnia. (England, 2nd half 13th century) From: Cambridge: Gonville and Caius College 334/727, fol. 201r–201v.
 05 Antti Auvinen
Facta (*1974) Composed for ÆroDynamic in 2006. Commission supported by the Finnish Council of Arts (Taideen Keskustoimikunta), Helsinki. Text: Yle1 Nuntii Latini / Reijo Pitkäranta.
06 John Dunstaple
Antiphon: Sub tuam protectionem. (+1473) From: Bologna, Liceo Musicale, Q 15, ff. 283v–284r e.a.
07 Jacopo da Bologna
Madrigal: Sotto l’imperio del possente prinçe. (fl. c1340 – c1360) From: Biblioteca Laurenziana, Florence. MS. Palatino 87 (Squarcialupi Codex), fol. 7v–8r.
08 Katarzyna Arnhold
In the alchemy of the world’s dream (*1968) Composed for ÆroDynamic in 2005 Text: Kathleen Raine (1908–2003) “Change” (from The Presence, 1987), and excerpts from “Three Poems of Incarnation” (from The Year One, 1952). Texts reproduced by permission of The Literary Estate of Kathleen Raine from The Collected Poems of Kathleen Raine, Golgonooza Press, 2000.
09 Leonel Power
Antiphon: Quam pulchra es et quam decora. (+1445) Granada, Capilla Real, Archivo de Música, MS. s.s.
10 John Dunstaple
Antiphon: Quam pulchra es et quam decora. (+1473) Motteta Francisci Guerreri…Venice, Antonius Gardanus, 1570.
11 Elizabeth Gaskill
Balloons (*1950) From the song cycle Colors. Composed for ÆroDynamic in 2010. Text: Edward Estlin Cummings (1894–1962) “In Just-” (originally published in The Dial, Volume LXVIII, No. 5: May 1920).

Total playing time: 59’35’’

Email

Descripción

The garden with countless windows

Una nueva visión de la voz y las flautas dulces.

El jardín de incontables ventanas era infinito… (Nikos Egonopoulos, ‘Rodia=SO2H4’)

El cambio es una realidad inevitable en la vida humana, y por tanto uno de los temas recurrentes en el arte, la poesía y la música a través de los siglos. En el poema Rodia-SO2H4 de Nikos Egonopoulos, el poeta sueña con un “jardín de incontables ventanas”: un espacio imposible y siempre cambiante en el que diversas historias, aparentemente inconexas e incompatibles, se unen formando una fascinante narrativa. Inspirándose en esta imagen, ÆroDynamic presenta una colección de reflexiones poéticas y musicales sobre el cambio.

El cambio se manifiesta en formas muy diversas, que varían desde el deseo o la contemplación de la belleza (Sus une fontayne en remirant) hasta la descripción de una terrible catástrofe (FACTA) o el retorno anual de la primavera (Balloons). En ocasiones, el cambio es deseado, por ejemplo cuando aporta honor (Resvellies vous), gozo o realización (Quam pulchra es) o cuando cobra la forma de una nueva vida que comienza (In the alchemy of the world’s dream). Sin embargo, el cambio es también temido cuando se manifiesta en la muerte, la debilidad humana, la incertidumbre del futuro o el enfrentamiento con lo desconocido o misterioso (Sotto l’imperio), que tratamos de evitar buscando la protección divina (Stella maris, Sub tuam protectionem).

Johannes Ciconia (c1370-1412) nació en Lieja pero dejó su ciudad natal tras formarse como niño de coro, desarrollando su carrera en el Norte de Italia, fundamentalmente en Pavia y Padua. Sus une fontayne en remirant es una impresionante composición fechada alrededor de 1390, cuando el compositor tenía tan sólo unos 20 años de edad. Este virelai (una de las “formas fijas” poéticas y musicales comunes en Francia, con la estructura ABBA’A) es un homenaje a la compleja tradición del ars subtilior, y más concretamente a uno de sus representantes: Philipoctus de Caserta, que fue probablemente uno de los maestros de Ciconia en Pavia. Ciconia cita tres frases poéticas y musicales de Caserta: ‘en remirant’, ‘en attendant souffrir’ y ‘de ma dolour’.

Rodia=SO2H4 describe un paisaje onírico creado por el amor, el deseo y el subconsciente. Palabra y música se funden en la versión musical del poema que la compositora griega Aspasia Nasopoulou (*1972) compuso para AeroDynamic en 2004. La tesitura relativamente aguda, en la que las flautas se mueven sólo ligeramente por encima y por debajo del registro vocal, evoca una atmósfera delicada y sensual. El artista visual Alexandro Kyrkos recreó el mundo visual del poema de Egonopoulos en un video que está disponible en la página web de AeroDynamic. Resveilles vous et faites chiere lye es una composición temprana de Guillaume Dufay (c1397-1474), escrita para conmemorar el matrimonio entre Carlo Malatesta y Vittoria Colonna, cuya boda se celebró el 18 de Julio de 1423. Al igual que Ciconia, Dufay desarrolló gran parte de su carrera en Italia. Su primer puesto fue precisamente en la corte de Malatesta en Rimini. a donde se trasladó en 1420. Ambos se habían conocido durante el Concilio de Constanza (1414-1418).

Stella maris illustrans omnia es una cantilena, una de las formas musicales polifónicas medievales inglesas. Se trata de una versión musical de un texto latino, con textura silábica y homófona. La mayoría de las cantilenas inglesas del siglo XIII tienen textos de tema mariano, como es el caso en Stella maris. También la estructura de esta pieza, con frases muy regulares (todas de la misma duración) es típica del género. Originalmente se alternaban las frases polifónicas (que contienen dos versos cada una) con dos versos en canto llano.

El movimiento paralelo de las voces, así como el uso frecuente de los intervalos de tercera y sexta son típicos de la música medieval inglesa. La textura armónica es de gran riqueza (la mayor parte de los acordes son tríadas) y las progresiones melódicas y armónicas proporcionan una fuerte sensación de dirección hacia la cadencia final de cada frase. La música medieval inglesa conservó cierta simplicidad hasta el siglo XV, especialmente en comparación con la complejidad del ars subtilior en Italia y Francia.

Una gran cantidad de composiciones de autores ingleses del siglo XV se han conservado en manuscritos continentales (sobre todo italianos y alemanes) como testimonio de la influencia inglesa en la creación de un nuevo estilo polifónico internacional. El músico ingles más prestigioso y respetado fue probablemente John Dunstaple (+1473), eminente no solo como músico sino también como matemático y astrónomo. Dunstaple probablemente viajó por Europa al servicio del Duque de Bedford y recibió, ya en vida y hasta un siglo después de su muerte, grandes elogios de diversos músicos y teóricos europeos.