Seleccionar página

Música para flauta y guitarra. Volumen I


Music for flute and guitar. Volume I

Mª Esther Guzmán y Luis Orden

Works by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Robert Beaser, Eduardo Morales Caso, Joan Albert Amargós y Astor Piazzolla.

Content

Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (1895-1968).
Sonatina, op. 205.
  • Allegretto gracioso.
  • Tempo de siciliana.
  • Allegretto con spirito.
Robert Beaser (1954).
Mountain Songs.
  • Barbara allen.
  • The house carpenter.
  • He’s gone away.
  • Hush you bye-cindy.
  • The cuckoo.
  • Fair and tender ladies.
  • Quicksilver.
Eduardo Morales Caso (1969).
Introduccion y tocatta.
Joan Albert Amargós (1950).
Tango catalá.
Astor Piazzolla (1921-1992).
Histoire du tango.
  • Bordel 1900.
  • Café 1930.
  • Nightclub 1960.
  • Concert d’aujourd’hui.

Sound and Production: José Mª Martín Valverde.

Email

Descripción

Música para flauta y guitarra. Volumen I

Music for flute and guitar. Volume I

Mª Esther Guzmán y Luis Orden

Works by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Robert Beaser, Eduardo Morales Caso, Joan Albert Amargós y Astor Piazzolla.

The guitar and flute are, without doubt, one of the most successful combinations in chamber music, especially since the 20th century. This disc is a fine example of that. In a profound, five-stage journey, Maria Esther Guzmán and Luis Orden take us through a delicious universe of sounds, timbres, multi-coloured languages and silences… From classical to popular, with impressionist, romantic and contemporary flavours. The repertoire is outstanding both in its quality and in its technical demands. Although it is nourished by the command and the personality of each instrument, the final result is a perfect blend of “instrumental independence” and the co-ordination and musicality of the duet which, like a single heartbeat, guides us wisely on this marvellous, shared journey.

The disc starts with the prolific Italian composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (Florence 1895-Beverly Hills, California 1968), who, once more, demonstrates his well-known predilection for the guitar in this “Sonatina” written in 1965. It is no coincidence that Tedesco had a close relationship with the Maestro Segovia. His life and work were shared between Italy and, after 1939, the United States, where he taught composition at the Los Angeles Conservatory. His catalogue is extensive and varied, including solo music, chamber music, orchestral, vocal, theatre and even cinema music. This apparently simple work has a high degree of technical difficulty, as both instruments constantly alternate and cede the leading part, holding a dialogue and playing on the melody. When the guitar is dense, harmonising and highly independent, the flute appears to lighten the weight of the strings and “flies” like a bird, creating a refreshingly carefree, lyrical feeling, especially in the first and third allegrettos. The fluidity of “Tempo di Siciliana” predisposes us to the quest for the neoclassical harmony that the composer himself so ardently sought.

The composer, pianist and clarinettist Joan Albert Amargós (Barcelona 1950) offers us a sample of his talent and artistic honesty in his short, popular 1996 piece, “Tango Catalá”, establishing an agile, warm communication between the flute and guitar by means of a captivating melody. Eclectic and impossible to pigeonhole, Amargós’s compositions include orchestral works, variations, requiems, cantatas and concerts for different instruments. But he has also worked with some of the great flamenco artists, including Camarón and Paco de Lucía, with jazz and Big Band, and has created some brilliant arrangements for singer-songwriters such as Serrat.

The work of Robert Beaser (Boston 1954) is an obvious homage to nature, taking us high over the Appalachian Mountains in his 1986 “Mountain Songs”. Beaser is considered a key figure among the “new tonalists”, and has created a unique style by synthesising western tradition with indigenous American traditions. He has won many awards and commissions from orchestras such as the New York Philharmonic and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and has recorded for the Argo, New World, Music Masters and EMI-Electrola labels. Today, Beaser is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Composition at the Juilliard School of Music. “Mountain Songs” is part of a cycle of eight movements based on songs from American folklore. The popular verses are the basis for the construction of a musical architecture that is in turn classical, romantic and impressionist, but which is still valid today. An infinite number of nuances lie within the “complex simplicity” of this work, from tranquillity to dizzying speed, from harmony to contrast…The guitar and flute slowly, deliberately invoke the symbolic elements of an imaginary distant landscape, the breath of the wind, the mystery of a sunset, the gallop of a horse, the solitude of a mountain, silence… The development of this music is imbued with an overwhelming feeling of silence, broken only sporadically by the joy of dances like “Cindy” or “Quicksilver”. In general, the sounds are long, spaced out and flowing, as in the masterful “He’s gone away“, which enraptures us from the very beginning with the magical appearance of the first string of guitar chords, its varied development and the infinite, emotional farewell from the flute. The piccolo is worked into the language of these songs, bringing movements of mysterious texture and references to the cinema in “The cuckoo”. From beginning to end, this score demands extraordinary concentration and mutual understanding between the musicians, who cannot relax for a moment before the demands of so many and such subtle “invitations to the imagination”. Without doubt, Maria Esther Guzmán and Luis Orden have managed to convey the sensation that this music springs forth not just from their skill as instrumentalists, but from the very entrails of the earth.

Información adicional

Artista

Luis Orden, María Esther Guzmán

Estilo

Contemporánea

Interpretación

Flute, Guitar

También te recomendamos…

Música para flauta y guitarra Volumen I


Música para Flauta y Guitarra. Vol. I.

Mª Esther Guzmán, guitarra.
Luis Orden, flauta.
Interpretando a Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Robert Beaser, Eduardo Morales Caso, Joan Albert Amargós y Astor Piazzolla.

Contenido

Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (1895-1968).
Sonatina, op. 205.
  • Allegretto gracioso.
  • Tempo de siciliana.
  • Allegretto con spirito.
Robert Beaser (1954).
Mountain Songs.
  • Barbara allen.
  • The house carpenter.
  • He’s gone away.
  • Hush you bye-cindy.
  • The cuckoo.
  • Fair and tender ladies.
  • Quicksilver.
Eduardo Morales Caso (1969).
Introduccion y tocatta.
Joan Albert Amargós (1950).
Tango catalá.
Astor Piazzolla (1921-1992).
Histoire du tango.
  • Bordel 1900.
  • Café 1930.
  • Nightclub 1960.
  • Concert d’aujourd’hui.

Toma de sonido y producción: José Mª Martín Valverde.

Email

Descripción

Música para flauta y guitarra Volumen I

Mª Esther Guzmán y Luis Orden

Interpretando a Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Robert Beaser, Eduardo Morales Caso, Joan Albert Amargós y Astor Piazzolla.

Guitarra y flauta constituyen, sin duda, uno de los binomios mejor avenidos de la música de cámara, especialmente a partir del siglo XX. Este disco es un buen ejemplo de ello. A través de un profundo recorrido en cinco etapas, Mª Esther Guzmán y Luis Orden nos pasean por un delicioso universo de sonidos, timbres, lenguajes multicolores y silencios… De lo clásico a lo popular, con aromas impresionistas, románticos y contemporáneos. El repertorio destaca, tanto por su calidad, como por su exigencia técnica. Aunque se nutre del dominio y personalidad de cada instrumento, el resultado final es una combinación perfecta entre esta “independencia instrumental”, y la coordinación y musicalidad del dúo, que nos conduce sabiamente y con un mismo latido por este hermoso viaje compartido.

Nos introducimos en el disco a través del prolífico compositor italiano Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (Florencia 1895-Beverly Hills, California 1968), que hace gala, una vez más, de su conocida predilección por la guitarra con esta “Sonatina” de 1965. No en vano, Tedesco mantuvo una estrecha relación con el Maestro Andrés Segovia. Su vida y obra se desarrollaron, tanto en Italia, como a partir de 1939 en Estados Unidos, donde enseñó composición en el Conservatorio de Los Ángeles. Su catálogo abarca desde música solista, cámara, orquesta, vocal y teatral, hasta música de cine.

Esta obra, de aparente sencillez, es de gran dificultad técnica, porque ambos instrumentos se alternan y ceden constantemente el papel protagonista, mediante el juego y diálogo con la melodía. Mientras la guitarra se muestra densa, concertante, y de gran independencia, la flauta parece aligerar el peso de las cuerdas, y “volar” como un pájaro, ofreciendo una refrescante sensación desenfadada y lírica, especialmente en el primer y tercer “allegrettos”. La fluidez del tema del “Tempo di Siciliana” nos predispone hacia la búsqueda de la armonía neoclásica, que tanto perseguía el propio autor.

El compositor, pianista y clarinetista Joan Albert Amargós (Barcelona 1950) nos ofrece en su “Tango Catalá” de 1996, una muestra de su talento y honestidad artística mediante una breve obra de estilo popular. En ella, se establece una ágil y cálida comunicación entre flauta y guitarra, a través de una cautivadora melodía. Ecléctico y ajeno a encasillamientos, Amargós ha compuesto obras orquestales, variaciones, réquiem, cantatas, conciertos para diversos instrumentos, etc. Pero también ha colaborado con grandes maestros del flamenco como Camarón o Paco de Lucía, con el mundo del jazz y la Big Band, y ha realizado brillantes arreglos para cantautores como Serrat.

Homenaje evidente a la naturaleza, es la obra de Robert Beaser (Boston 1954), que nos eleva por encima de los Montes Apalaches con su “Mountain Songs”, de 1986. Beaser es considerado como figura importante entre los “nuevos tonalistas”, y ha logrado un estilo singular sintetizando la tradición occidental con las tradiciones autóctonas norteamericanas. Ha recibido múltiples premios y encargos de orquestas como la New York Philharmonic o la Chicago Symphony, grabando para los sellos Argo, New World, Music Masters y EMI-Electrola.

Actualmente, Beaser es director del departamento de composición de la Juilliard School of Music. “Mountain songs” pertenece a un ciclo de ocho movimientos basados en canciones del folklore norteamericano. De estas estrofas populares, parte la construcción de una arquitectura musical, que se troca en clásica, romántica e impresionista, pero de absoluta vigencia en nuestra época. En la “complejísima sencillez “de esta obra, duermen infinidad de matices que oscilan de lo tranquilo a lo vertiginoso, de la armonía al contraste… La guitarra y la flauta invocan, pausadamente, a elementos simbólicos de un lejano paisaje imaginario: el fluir del viento, el misterio de una puesta de sol, el galope de un caballo, la soledad de la montaña, y el silencio… Una sobrecogedora sensación de silencio impregna el desarrollo de esta música, sólo roto esporádicamente por la alegría de danzas como “Cindy” o “Quicksilver”.

En general, los sonidos tienden a fluir espaciados y largos, como en la magistral “He’s gone away“, que nos envuelve desde el inicio con la mágica aparición de la primera estela de acordes de guitarra, su variado desarrollo, y la infinita y emocionante despedida de la flauta. El flautín colabora al lenguaje de estas canciones, incorporándose en “The cukoo”, movimiento de texturas misteriosas y guiños cinematográficos. De principio a fin, esta partitura exige un alarde especial de concentración y compenetración entre los intérpretes, que no pueden permitirse un segundo de relajación, ante la exigencia de tantas y tan sutiles “invitaciones a la imaginación”.

Sin duda, Mª Esther Guzmán y Luis Orden han conseguido brindarnos la sensación de que esta música brota, no sólo de la calidad de sus instrumentos, sino de las entrañas de la propia tierra.

Información adicional

Estilo

Contemporánea

Interpretación

Flauta, Guitarra

Artista

María Esther Guzmán y Luis Orden