Seleccionar página

Flores de Música

7,00


Flores de Música

Works and verses by various organists. Fray Antonio Martín y Coll.

Andrés Cea

National Library of Madrid, signatura M 1357.

Content

Estremera

Organ Pedro Liborna Echevarría (1716)

  • 1. Obra de clarines 8º tono, mano derecha. 7’53
  • 2. Pasacalle de primer tono. 1’28
  • 3. Obra de primer tono de mano derecha. 13’10
  • 4. Ligaduras para la Elevación. 4’20
  • 5. Obra de lleno de 4º tono. 5’45
  • 6. Pangelingua. 1’53
Leganés

Organ José de Verdalonga (1790)

  • 7. Batalla de quinto tono. 5’42
  • 8. Obra de falsas cromáticas. 4’25
  • 9. Bailete en lleno. 0’59
  • 10. Obra de lleno de 4º tono. 5’05
Valdemoro

Organ Pedro Liborna Echevarría (1737)

  • 11. Diferencias sobre la gaita. 4’09
  • 12. Obra de primer tono. Canción italiana. 8’22
  • 13. Pasacalle de primer tono. 2’51
  • 14. Xácara. 1’44
  • 15. Obra de tercer tono. Canción 4’02

Andrés Cea. Organs of the Community of Madrid.

Email
SKU: MPC-0121 Categorías: , , Etiquetas: , ,

Descripción

Flores de Música

Works and verses by various organists. Fray Antonio Martín y Coll.

In 1662, the Franciscan organ builder, Joseph de Echevarría built a brand new organ for the church of Santiago in Bilbao. For the first time, he included a corneta de ecos which, unlike the French echos de cornet, could be played on the same main manual. A few years later, in 1672, he included an improved version of this stop for the instrument in the Cathedral at Calahorra, where the corneta en ecos also had a “comeandgo” mechanism which made the music seem like it was moving further away or getting closer, producing, in essence, a crescendo or decrescendo effect. Doing this is technically simple, but the effect is ingenious. The pipes for this stop are enclosed in a wooden box whose lid can be opened or closed by moving the organist’s foot or knee whenever he wanted to.

A little later, around 1674-5, Echevarría was in Alcalá de Henares, building an instrument for the conventof San Diego. In this extraordinary instrument he not only included echo boxes for the corneta, but also for the clarín [clarion] and flautado [principal] as well. Besides this, he also invented a stop called the clarínes. The pipes in this stop actually extend horizontally outside the case and look like canons on the side of a battleship. In the following years, Echevarría included these “echo effects” and the famous “artillery-like clarions” in all the organs he built in and around Madrid, as well as in the Basque Country and in the Cathedral at Palencia. These instruments and these stops marked the beginning of a new technique and a new aesthetic approach to organ building in Spain.

After Echevarría’s death in 1691, his students and followers expanded upon these concepts, first in Castile, Galicia and Portugal and later in Andalucía. From there it spread to Mexico. And, from 1730 on, there were practically no organs in Spain or its colonies that were not aware of -or influenced by- these developments, and they quickly became defining elements of the Spanish (Iberian style) organ up to the present day.

This process was, undoubtedly, reinforced by the presence of organists who appreciated the inherent values in these novel concepts and, as performers, they were able to effectively implement them. That is to say: besides building a new type of instrument, a new repertoire had to be created in which the clarines and ecos played a prominent role.

Among the musical sources related to this new type of music and the new instruments which were being built in the last 25 years of the 17th century, the manuscripts of Antonio Martín y Coll (1671- 1734), now preserved in the National Library in Madrid, are clearly the most important both in quantity and quality. Antonio Martín y Coll was a professed monk at the monastery of San Diego de Alcalá, where he played the clarines and ecos on the famous Echevarría organ. It was here in this city that Martín y Coll studied with Andrés Lorente (1624-1703), organist at the church of Sts. Justus and Pastor. Starting in 1707, Martín y Coll was organist at San Francisco el Grande in Madrid, and thus, came into contact with musicians at the court of the first Bourbon King, Philip V.

One of Martín y Coll’s five extant manuscript volumes is collected under the title “Flores de música. Obras y versos de varios organistas” (BNM, M 1357) with the date 1706 on the front cover. It does, indeed, contain versets and various kinds of pieces by a number of different composers. Unfortunately, the copyist only identified the composers of two works, one by Xaraba and another one by Francisco Paulo Capocio, who was violinist at the Royal Chapel in Madrid and active around 1680. Certain concordances from other source material have also helped us to identify Andrés de Sola as one of those other “various organists” whose works Martín y Coll copied out, but the rest of the pieces are presented as an enormous mass of music by otherwise anonymous composers.

However, unlike other things Martín y Coll copied out, manuscript M 1357 is mainly devoted to pieces in the modern style related to ecos and clarines. So, the music can be dated between 1680-1710 and can be said to have originated in two major centers: the Zaragoza School and the Royal Chapel (Madrid). Both musical centers had a number of musicians and composers in common who were active in both centers around this same period. One example of this can be found in Diego and Francisco Xaraba, who both studied with their uncle, the blind organist from Daroca, Pablo Bruna. Diego Xaraba was appointed to the post of organist at the Royal Chapel in 1677 where he remained until his death in 1716. Francisco, who succeeded his uncle as organist in Daroca, was also employed at the Royal Chapel in 1687, although he died shortly after that, in 1690.

Another connection along these same lines is frair Joseph Sanz, who was member of a line of organists from Aragón, together with Francisco and Juan. The present state of research does not allow us to know with any certainty the details of the various posts they held. We do know that Joseph Sanz was educated in Daroca. And later, was apparently organist in Seville, Toledo and Ciudad Real before entering the Royal Chapel, where he stayed until 1691. Martín y Coll, in fact, dedicated his Arte de canto llano to him in 1714.

Andrés de Sola (1634-1696) succeeded his uncle and former teacher, José Jiménez, as organist at the Cathedral of Zaragoza. De Sola then taught Sebastián Durón (1660-1716) who was later employed at Seville and Burgo de Osma and, in 1686, became organist at the Cathedral in Palencia. It was here that Durón took part in the building of the famous Echevarría organ, in all probability, as a consultant/ assessor. In 1691, he entered the Royal Chapel, succeeding Joseph Sanz as organist. Later on, he was to become rector at the Royal School for Choirboys, and was in charge of organizing theatrical productions at the Buen Retiro and in Aranjuez.

Información adicional

Artista

Andrés Cea

Estilo

Barroco

Interpretación

Órgano ibérico

También te recomendamos…

Flores de Música

7,00


Flores de Música

Obras y versos de varios organistas escritas por fray Antonio Martín Coll, 1706.

Andrés Cea

Biblioteca Nacional de Madrid, signatura M 1357.

Contenido

Estremera

Órgano Pedro Liborna Echevarría (1716)

  • 1. Obra de clarines 8º tono, mano derecha. 7’53
  • 2. Pasacalle de primer tono. 1’28
  • 3. Obra de primer tono de mano derecha. 13’10
  • 4. Ligaduras para la Elevación. 4’20
  • 5. Obra de lleno de 4º tono. 5’45
  • 6. Pangelingua. 1’53
Leganés

Órgano José de Verdalonga (1790)

  • 7. Batalla de quinto tono. 5’42
  • 8. Obra de falsas cromáticas. 4’25
  • 9. Bailete en lleno. 0’59
  • 10. Obra de lleno de 4º tono. 5’05
Valdemoro

Órgano Pedro Liborna Echevarría (1737)

  • 11. Diferencias sobre la gaita. 4’09
  • 12. Obra de primer tono. Canción italiana. 8’22
  • 13. Pasacalle de primer tono. 2’51
  • 14. Xácara. 1’44
  • 15. Obra de tercer tono. Canción 4’02

Andrés Cea. Órganos de la Comunidad de Madrid.

Email
SKU: MPC-0121 Categorías: , , ,

Descripción

Flores de Música

Obras y versos de varios organistas. Fray Antonio Martín y Coll.

Al Profesor Louis Jambou

En 1662, el organero franciscano fray Joseph de Echevarría construía un órgano de nueva planta para la iglesia de Santiago de Bilbao. Coloca aquí, por primera vez, un registro de corneta en ecos que, a diferencia de los echos de cornet franceses, puede tocarse desde el mismo teclado principal. El invento se vería perfeccionado unos años más tarde en el órgano de la catedral de Calahorra, construido en 1672, cuando esa misma corneta en ecos incorpe un mecanismo de “voy y vengo”, capaz de producir el efecto de alejar y acercar progresivamente las voces, produciendo un efecto de crescendo y decrescendo o “suspensión”.

La realización técnica de este recurso es simple, pero industriosa: los tubos correspondientes a este registro irán encerrados en una caja de madera cuya tapa puede abrirse o cerrarse a voluntad mediante un movimiento del pie o de la rodilla del organista. Poco después, hacia 1674-5 el fraile organero está en Alcalá de Henares, construyendo un órgano en el convento de San Diego. En este extraordinario instrumento no sólo habría ecos para la corneta, sino también para el clarín y para el flautado. Además, inventa un registro de clarines cuyos pabellones deben asomar en horizontal por la fachada, simulando la figura de “cañones de buque”. En los años sucesivos, estos ecos y los famosos “clarines en forma de artillería” se irán repitiendo en todos los órganos que fray Joseph de Echevarraía construye en la zona de Madrid, en el País Vasco y en la catedral de Palencia. Definen ya una nueva técnica y una nueva estética en el arte de la construcción de órganos en España.

Tras la muerte de fray Joseph, en 1691, sus discípulos expandirán esta técnica, primero por Castilla, Galicia y Portugal, luego por Andalucía, desde donde se exporta a México. A partir de 1730, prácticamente ningún órgano construido en territorio hispánico ignorará tales novedades, convertidas en señas de identidad del concepto “órgano ibérico” hasta nuestros días. Es indiscutible que ese proceso vino apoyado por la presencia de organistas capaces de poner en juego y en valor las novedades introducidas por los organeros. De modo que, paralelamente a la construcción de un nuevo tipo de órgano, se asiste a un proceso de creación de un nuevo tipo de música en el que clarines y ecos tienen relevante protagonismo. Entre las fuentes musicales relacionadas con esta nueva música y con los nuevos órganos creados en España a partir del último cuarto del siglo XVII, lo más importante en cantidad y calidad se encuentra en los conocidos manuscritos de fray Antonio Martín y Coll (1671-1734) conservados en la Biblioteca Nacional de Madrid.

Fray Antonio fue monje profeso en el monasterio de San Diego de Alcalá, donde disfrutó de los clarines y de los ecos del famoso órgano construido por fray Joseph de Echevarría. En esta ciudad fue discípulo de Andrés Lorente (1624-1703), organista de la iglesia de los Santos Justo y Pastor. A partir de 1707, encontramos a fray Antonio Martín y Coll como organista en San Francisco el Grande de Madrid y en contacto directo, por tanto, con el ambiente musical de la corte del primer Borbón.

De los cinco volúmenes existentes de la colección manuscrita de fray Antonio Martín, el titulado “Flores de música. Obras y versos de varios organistas” (BNM, M 1357) lleva en portada la fecha de 1706 y contiene, en efecto, versos y obras variadas de diversos autores. Desgraciadamente, el copista sólo identifica a Xaraba y al violinista de la Real Capilla Francisco Paulo Capocio (activo en torno a 1680) como autores de sendas obras del manuscrito. Ciertas concordancias con otras fuentes sirven para identificar también a Andrés de Sola como uno de aquellos “varios organistas” cuyas obras copió fray Antonio, pero el resto de piezas se presenta como una cantidad ingente de música de autor anónimo. No obstante, a diferencia de lo que ocurre con los otros volúmenes copiados por fray Antonio Martín y Coll, el manuscrito M 1357 contiene principalmente piezas en ese estilo moderno relacionado con ecos y clarines. La datación de la música corresponde, por tanto, al periodo 1680-1710, con dos canales principales de procedencia: la escuela zaragozana y la Real Capilla. Ambos círculos musicales encuentran diversos puntos de confluencia precisamente en el entorno madrileño en torno a esas fechas.

Uno de esos puntos de confluencia lo definen Diego y Francisco Xaraba, sobrinos y discípulos de Pablo Bruna, el ciego de Daroca. Diego Xaraba ingresa como organista de la Real Capilla en 1677, donde permanece hasta su muerte en 1716. Francisco, que sucedió a su tío como organista en Daroca, llega también a la Real Capilla en 1687, anunque muere poco más tarde, en 1690. Por otro lado, fray Joseph Sanz, miembro de una saga de organistas de ascendencia aragonesa, a la que pertenecen igualmente Francisco y Juan, cuyos itinerarios resulta dificil establecer por el momento. Fray Joseph se formó también en Daroca. Fue organista al parecer en Sevilla, Toledo y Ciudad Real antes de llegar a la Capilla Real, donde está hasta 1691. Será,precisamente, el dedicatario del Arte de canto llano publicado por Fray Antonio Martín y Coll en 1714.

De otra parte, Andrés de Sola (1634-1696) había sucedido a su tío y maestro, José Jiménez, como organista de la Seo de Zaragoza. Allí será maestro, a su vez, de Sebastián Durón (1660-1716) quien, tras pasar por Sevilla y Burgo de Osma, ocupa la plaza de organista de la catedral de Palencia en 1686. Allí, Durón asiste al proceso de construcción del famoso órgano de fray José de Echevarría, actuando muy probablemente como asesor durante la obra. En 1691 llegará también a la Real Capilla, sucediendo en el puesto de organista a Joseph Sanz. Será luego maestro de capilla y rector del colegio de niños cantores, además de estar encargado de la organización de los espectáculos teatrales en el Buen Retiro y en Aranjuez.

Información adicional

Estilo

Barroco

Interpretación

Órgano Ibérico

Artista

Andrés Cea Galán