Seleccionar página

Angeli, zingare & pastori

8,00


Angeli, Zingare & Pastori

Renaissance music from Venice, Naples and Rome

The Royal Wind Music

Conductor: Paul Leenhouts.

Content

[1] Intrada X [a6] Alessandro Orologio.
  • Intradae Alexandri Orologii… Liber primus, Helmstedt 1597 (c1550 – 1633)
[2] Pavin of Albart & Gallyard [a5] Innocentio Alberti.
  • British Library, London, MS Royal Appendix 74 [‘Lumley Books’] (c1535 – 1615)
[3] Ballo detto ‘Il Conde Orlando’ [a5] Simone Molinaro Intavolatura di liuto, libro primo, Venice 1599 (c1570 – after 1633)
[4] El travagliato [a3] Vincenzo Ruffo.
  • Capricci in musica a tre voci, Milan 1564 (c1508 – 1587)
[5] Canzon sopra ‘Falt d’argens’ [a4] Girolamo Cavazzoni.
  • Intavolatura, cioè ricercari, canzoni, himni… Libro primo, Venice 1543 (c1525 – after 1577)
[6] Canzon: la Chremasca [a4] Tarquinio Merula.
  • Il primo libro delle canzoni a quattro voci…, Venice 1615 (c1595 – 1665)
[7] Canzon: la Poggina [a4] Gioseffo Guami.
  • Partidura per sonare delle canzonette alla francese, Venice 1612 (1542 – 1611)
[8] O quam suavis est Domine spiritus tuus [a7] Jacopo Corfini.
  • Concerti di Iacopo Corfini… continenti musica di chiesa…, Venice 1591 (c1540 – 1591?)
[9] Adoramus te, Christe [a4] Paolo Agostini.
  • Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome, MS 8925 Rari, st. mus. 29 (c1625-26) (c1583 – 1629)
[10] Diligam te, Domine [a6] Ascanio Trombetti.
  • Il primo libro di motetti accomodati per cantare e far concerti, Venice 1589 (1544 – 1590)
[11] Praeambulum legatura [a5] Attr. Girolamo Frescobaldi.
  • F 15.15 (1583 – 1643)
[12] Ricercar ottavo, obligo di non uscir mai di grado [a4] Girolamo Frescobaldi.
  • Recercari et canzoni francese fatte sopra diversi obblighi in partitura, Rome 1615 (1583 – 1643)
[13] Ricercar del primo tono [a4] Andrea Gabrieli.
  • Ricercari di Andrea Gabrieli organista di Venetia…, Venice 1595 (c1533-1585)
[14] Salterello detto Trivella [a5] Orazio Vecchi.
  • Selva di varia ricreatione, Venice 1590 (1550 – 1605)
[15] Odecha ki’anitani[a6] Salomone Rossi.
  • Hashirim asher lish’lomo, Venice 1623 (1570 – c1630)
[16] Sinfonia [a5].
[17] Gagliarda detta Narciso [a5].
  • Il secondo libro delle sinfonie et gagliarde, Venice 1608
[18] Gagliarda prima detta la Galante [a5] Giovanni Maria Trabaci.
[19] Gagliarda terza detta la Talianella [a5] (c1575 – 1647).
  • Il secondo libro de ricercate & altri varii capricci, Naples, 1615
[20] Chi la gagliarda, donne, vo’ imparare [a4] Baldassare Donato.
  • Napollitane, et alcuni madrigali, Venice 1550 (c1529 – 1603)
[21] All’arm’ all’arme [a5] Lodovico Agostini.
  • Canzoni alla napolitana, libro primo, Venice 1574 (1534-1590)

The Royal Wind Music.

  • Conductor: Paul Leenhouts
  • Petri Arvo
  • Alana Blackburn
  • Stephanie Brandt
  • Ruth Dyson
  • Eva Gemeinhardt
  • Arwieke Glas
  • Hester Groenleer
  • Karin Hageneder
  • Marco Paulo Alves Magalhães
  • María Martínez Ayerza
  • Belén Nieto Galán
  • Filipa Margarida da Silveira Pereira
  • Anna Stegmann: renaissance recorders.
Email

Descripción

Angeli, zingare & pastori

Renaissance music from Venice, Naples & Rome

The Royal Wind Music

L’huomo ben istituito non debe essere senza Musica

‘A well established man must not be without music’

(Gioseffo Zarlino, Istitutioni harmoniche, 1583)

Angeli, zingare & pastori (Angels, gypsies and shepherds) is a journey through the many characters of ensemble music in late 16th and early 17th century Italy. The title refers to three recurrent allegories found not only in music but also in literature and the visual arts. Angels are messengers and archetypical symbols of the divine and supernatural. Their voices shine through in the motets by Corfini, Agostini, Trombetti and Rossi. Arcadian shepherds represent the ideals of beauty and harmony, translated into music in the elegant dances by Alberti, Molinaro and Rossi and in the well-balanced instrumental pieces by Cavazzoni, Guami and Andrea Gabrieli. Finally, gypsies and other marginal figures show an increasing interest of the arts in aspects of human life that are often hidden or repressed. In the visual arts, these characters provided a perfect medium to challenge the traditional artistic laws – an element present in the music of composers like Ruffo, Frescobaldi or Trabaci.

Three cities

The repertoire included in this recording proceeds from three prominent musical centers: Venice, Naples and Rome. Italy was not a unified country at the time, and the political and musical circumstances of these three cities were quite different. The Republic of Venice had been a city-state since the early Middle Ages, ruled by a Doge (chief magistrate) elected for life by the aristocracy. The strategic geographical situation of the city was crucial for the extraordinary development of its maritime trade during the Middle Ages. By 1500 this commerce was already in decline, unable to compete with the European routes to the New World, but other sorts of trade flourished. For example, the city came to dominate the music publishing business. In 1501 Ottaviano Petrucci published Harmonice musices odhecaton, the first collection of printed polyphonic music. By 1550 the Venetian printing houses, among them the workshops of the Scotto and Gardane families, were publishing the works of local and foreign composers and distributing them nationally and internationally. A quick glance at the playlist reveals that many of the pieces on this recording were printed in Venice, while their composers worked and lived in more or less distant North-Italian cities like Genoa (Molinaro), Bologna (Trombetti), Lucca (Guami, Corfini), Mantua (Rossi) or Cremona (Merula).

The Kingdom of Naples developed a very distinctive musi- cal style and practice after it became a viceroyalty of Spain in 1503. The Spanish viceroys maintained a Royal Chapel in the city of Naples, that became an important symbol of power and prosperity. In 1614, when Giovanni Maria Trabaci was appointed maestro di capella, the chapel consisted of 26 singers and 12 instrumentalists. The viceroys also promoted the integration of the arts and particularly music in the education of young noblemen throughout the Kingdom. Many aristocrats became highly skilled composers, some of them as revered as Prince Carlo Gesualdo da Venosa. Gesualdo’s music was highly experimental: his extreme chromaticism remains surprising, even for contemporary ears. It reveals a taste for experimentation characteristic of the Neapolitan school that is also present in Trabaci’s music, and, in a lighter manner, in the exciting rhythms of the canzone alla napoli- tana by Donato and Lodovico Agostini.

It is almost impossible to plan a musical journey through Italy without a brief stop in Rome. At the time, the city was the capital of the Papal States, which expanded over a large portion of central Italy. The most prominent musical institutions of the city were associated with the Papacy, but many other churches also had choirs, organists and instrumentalists at their service. The nobility and the high ranks of the church employed musicians or protected them through patronage. The many possibilities the city offered to professional musicians attracted figures like the Ferrarese composer Girolamo Frescobaldi, who spent many years in Rome enjoying the patronage of powerful families like cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini’s and participating in the musical life of the city through regular employment as an organist but also teaching privately, performing in aristocratic circles and taking up extra work at various churches in special occasions.

Información adicional

Artista

The Royal Wind Music

Estilo

Renacimiento

Interpretación

Flutes, Instrumental

También te recomendamos…

Angeli, Zingare & Pastori

8,00


Angeli, Zingare & Pastori

Música renacentista de Venecia, Nápoles y Roma

The Royal Wind Music.

Director: Paul Leenhouts.

Contenido

[1] Intrada X [a6] Alessandro Orologio.
  • Intradae Alexandri Orologii… Liber primus, Helmstedt 1597 (c1550 – 1633)
[2] Pavin of Albart & Gallyard [a5] Innocentio Alberti.
  • British Library, London, MS Royal Appendix 74 [‘Lumley Books’] (c1535 – 1615)
[3] Ballo detto ‘Il Conde Orlando’ [a5] Simone Molinaro Intavolatura di liuto, libro primo, Venice 1599 (c1570 – after 1633)
[4] El travagliato [a3] Vincenzo Ruffo.
  • Capricci in musica a tre voci, Milan 1564 (c1508 – 1587)
[5] Canzon sopra ‘Falt d’argens’ [a4] Girolamo Cavazzoni.
  • Intavolatura, cioè ricercari, canzoni, himni… Libro primo, Venice 1543 (c1525 – after 1577)
[6] Canzon: la Chremasca [a4] Tarquinio Merula.
  • Il primo libro delle canzoni a quattro voci…, Venice 1615 (c1595 – 1665)
[7] Canzon: la Poggina [a4] Gioseffo Guami.
  • Partidura per sonare delle canzonette alla francese, Venice 1612 (1542 – 1611)
[8] O quam suavis est Domine spiritus tuus [a7] Jacopo Corfini.
  • Concerti di Iacopo Corfini… continenti musica di chiesa…, Venice 1591 (c1540 – 1591?)
[9] Adoramus te, Christe [a4] Paolo Agostini.
  • Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome, MS 8925 Rari, st. mus. 29 (c1625-26) (c1583 – 1629)
[10] Diligam te, Domine [a6] Ascanio Trombetti.
  • Il primo libro di motetti accomodati per cantare e far concerti, Venice 1589 (1544 – 1590)
[11] Praeambulum legatura [a5] Attr. Girolamo Frescobaldi.
  • F 15.15 (1583 – 1643)
[12] Ricercar ottavo, obligo di non uscir mai di grado [a4] Girolamo Frescobaldi.
  • Recercari et canzoni francese fatte sopra diversi obblighi in partitura, Rome 1615 (1583 – 1643)
[13] Ricercar del primo tono [a4] Andrea Gabrieli.
  • Ricercari di Andrea Gabrieli organista di Venetia…, Venice 1595 (c1533-1585)
[14] Salterello detto Trivella [a5] Orazio Vecchi.
  • Selva di varia ricreatione, Venice 1590 (1550 – 1605)
[15] Odecha ki’anitani[a6] Salomone Rossi.
  • Hashirim asher lish’lomo, Venice 1623 (1570 – c1630)
[16] Sinfonia [a5].
[17] Gagliarda detta Narciso [a5].
  • Il secondo libro delle sinfonie et gagliarde, Venice 1608
[18] Gagliarda prima detta la Galante [a5] Giovanni Maria Trabaci.
[19] Gagliarda terza detta la Talianella [a5] (c1575 – 1647).
  • Il secondo libro de ricercate & altri varii capricci, Naples, 1615
[20] Chi la gagliarda, donne, vo’ imparare [a4] Baldassare Donato.
  • Napollitane, et alcuni madrigali, Venice 1550 (c1529 – 1603)
[21] All’arm’ all’arme [a5] Lodovico Agostini.
  • Canzoni alla napolitana, libro primo, Venice 1574 (1534-1590)

The Royal Wind Music.

  • Director: Paul Leenhouts
  • Petri Arvo
  • Alana Blackburn
  • Stephanie Brandt
  • Ruth Dyson
  • Eva Gemeinhardt
  • Arwieke Glas
  • Hester Groenleer
  • Karin Hageneder
  • Marco Paulo Alves Magalhães
  • María Martínez Ayerza
  • Belén Nieto Galán
  • Filipa Margarida da Silveira Pereira
  • Anna Stegmann: renaissance recorders.
Email
SKU: NL-3018 Categorías: , ,

Descripción

Angeli, zingare & pastori

Música renacentista de Venecia, Nápoles y Roma

L’huomo ben istituito non debe essere senza Musica. “Al hombre bien formado no le debe faltar la música”
Gioseffo Zarlino, Istitutioni harmoniche (1583)

Angeli, zingare & pastori (Ángeles, zíngaros y pastores) es un viaje a través de los diversos caracteres de la música para conjunto instrumental de finales del siglo XVI y principios del XVII. El título se refiere a tres alegorías recurrentes en la música, la literatura y las artes visuales. Los ángeles son mensajeros y símbolos arquetípicos de lo divino y lo sobrenatural. Sus voces resuenan en los motetes de Corfini, Agostini, Trombetti y Rossi. Los pastores representan un canon de belleza y armonía presente en las elegantes danzas de Alberti, Molinaro y Rossi y en la equilibrada música instrumental de Cavazzoni, Guami y Andrea Gabrieli. Por último, los zíngaros y otras figuras marginales demuestran el creciente interés del arte en lo oculto, lo desconocido y transgresor. Diversos pintores renacentistas encontraron en estos caracteres un medio idóneo para enfrentarse a las leyes artísticas convencionales. Un elemento experimental equiparable se manifiesta en la música de Ruffo, Frescobaldi y Trabaci.

Tres ciudades

El repertorio incluido en esta grabación procede de tres centros musicales de importancia: Venecia, Nápoles y Roma. A finales del siglo XVI Italia no era un país unificado y la situación política y musical de las tres ciudades era muy diferente. La República de Venecia era una ciudad-estado, ya desde la temprana Edad Media. El jefe de estado era el Dogo, elegido de por vida por una asamblea de aristócratas. La estratégica situación geográfica de la ciudad fue crucial para el espectacular desarrollo de su comercio marítimo durante la Edad Media. Hacia 1500 este comercio ya estaba en declive, incapaz de competir con las rutas comerciales entre Europa y el Nuevo Mundo. Sin embargo, Venecia mantuvo su espíritu comercial y se convirtió, por ejemplo, en el principal centro de la industria editorial musical durante buena parte del siglo XVI. En 1501 Ottaviano Petrucci publicó Harmonice musices odhecaton, la primera colección conocida de música polifónica impresa. Hacia 1550 los talleres de impresión venecianos, entre ellos los de las familias Scotto y Gardane, publicaban música de compositores locales y extranjeros y la distribuían a nivel nacional e internacional. Una gran parte de las piezas incluidas en este disco se publicaron en Venecia, aunque sus autores vivían y trabajaban en otras localidades del Norte de Italia como Génova (Molinaro), Boloña (Trombetti), Lucca (Guami y Corfini), Mantua (Rossi) o Cremona (Merula).

El Reino de Nápoles se encontraba bajo dominio español desde 1503 y desarrolló un estilo musical propio y muy particular. Los virreyes establecieron una Capilla Real en la ciudad de Nápoles como símbolo del poder y la prosperidad del reino. En 1614, cuando Giovanni Maria Trabaci fue nombrado maestro de capilla, el conjunto estaba formado por 26 cantantes y 12 instrumentistas. Los diversos virreyes también promovieron la integración de las artes y particularmente de la música en la formación de los jóvenes aristócratas en todo el reino. Varios de ellos llegaron a ser excelentes compositores, tan eminentes como el príncipe Carlo Gesualdo da Venosa. La música de Gesualdo era altamente experimental: su cromatismo aún nos resulta sorprendente hoy en día, y revela un gusto por la experimentación carácteristico de la escuela napolitana. Este elemento experimental es audible en la música de Trabaci y, de forma algo más liviana, en los excitantes ritmos de las canciones a la napolitana de Donato y Lodovico Agostini.

Es prácticamente imposible realizar un viaje musical por Italia sin pasar por Roma, la capital de los Estados Pontificios, que en aquel momento comprendían una buena parte del centro de Italia. Las instituciones musicales más prominentes de Roma estaban al servicio del Papa, aunque también muchas iglesias fuera del Vaticano contaban con coros, organistas e instrumentistas. Además, la nobleza y los altos cargos eclesiásticos empleaban o protegían a músicos de talento. Las enormes posibilidades que la ciudad ofrecía a un músico profesional atrajeron a figuras como Girolamo Frescobaldi, originario de Ferrara, que pasó muchos años en Roma disfrutando de la protección de poderosas familias como la del cardenal Pietro Aldobrandini y trabajando como organista, profesor particular y concertista en los círculos aristocráticos y eclesiásticos más selectos.

Deleite a través de la armonía

Durante el siglo XVI, la belleza de la música tendía a explicarse en términos matemáticos, como un reflejo de la armonía del Universo. Los teóricos italianos Gioseffo Zarlino y Lodovico Zacconi afirman en sus escritos que una razón fundamental por la que la música es agradable al oido es que el intelecto comprende su orden y estructura. Zacconi sostiene que la comprensión intelectual de la música nos lleva a anticipar cómo va a continuar una melodía que estamos escuchando, y que esta sensación de anticipación contribuye al disfrute de la música. También afirma que la escucha es tanto más placentera cuando ocasionalmente hay un giro melódico o armónico inesperado que burla nuestras expectativas.

Esta visión intelectual de la música se manifiesta claramente en el ricercare, una forma erudita de música instrumental. Hacia 1540 el ricercare se convirtió en un “laboratorio” para la investigación del contrapunto y la imitación a través del trabajo sistemático con uno o varios temas. Andrea Gabrieli, organista en la Basílica veneciana de San Marco entre 1566 y 1585, desempeñó un papel fundamental en el desarrollo del ricercare. Gabrieli fue el primer compositor que integró sistemáticamente técnicas complejas como la aumentación, disminución o inversión de un tema en sus ricercares. Su Ricercar del primo tono [12] es una composición impresionante y muy equilibrada construida sobre un único tema que pasa de una voz a otra rodeado de elegantes melodías.

La armonía y el equilibrio también son la base de manifestaciones musicales mucho menos abstractas. El maestro bailarín Fabrizio Caroso afirma en el prefacio a su libro Il ballarino que la danza está gobernada por “proporciones armoniosas” que agradan al espectador y que confieren nobleza al baile. El primer grupo de danzas de este disco está precedido por una intrada [1] del trompetista italiano Alessandro Orologio. Una intrada es una breve pieza instrumental que anuncia o acompaña la llegada de una persona importante o el comienzo de una actividad. Al igual que Orologio, Innocentio Alberti también era instrumentista: en documentos de la corte de Este en Ferrara se le menciona como “Innocentio del cornetto”. Aunque Alberti publicó varias colecciones de madrigales en Italia, su Pavin & Gallyard [2] se han preservado en un manuscrito inglés conocido como Lumley Books. Estas dos danzas se basan en la pavana y gallarda Si je m’en vois publicadas por Pierre Attaingnant en París en 1556, aunque la versión de Alberti es más elaborada que el original francés e incluye refinadas disminuciones en las dos voces superiores. El elegante Ballo detto il Conde Orlando [3] del laudista, compositor y editor genovés Simone Molinaro completa este bloque de tres danzas.

Las danzas de Alberti y, sobre todo, la Gagliarda detta Narciso [17] y la Sinfonia [16] de Salomone Rossi presentan una clara división de funciones entre las distintas voces. En las piezas de Rossi, el conjunto instrumental se divide en tres grupos: las dos voces superiores desempeñan el papel de solistas, el bajo provee el fundamento armónico y rítmico, y las voces intermedias completan la armonía. Esta textura, especialmente obvia en la Sinfonia, preludia la de la sonata en trío para dos instrumentos melódicos y bajo continuo.

Las canzonas de Cavazzoni, Merula y Guami unen la experimentación contrapuntística del ricercare y la frivolidad de la danza, e ilustran el desarrollo de esta forma musical a lo largo del siglo XVI. Como su nombre indica, la canzona tiene su origen en el arreglo instrumental de chansons (canciones polifónicas en francés). Por ejemplo, la Canzon sopra Falt d’argens [5] de Girolamo Cavazzoni es una pieza para órgano basada en un original atribuido a Josquin des Prez. El caracter desesperado del texto original es tan pertinente en el siglo XXI como lo era en el XVI: “La falta de dinero es un dolor sin par. Si digo esto, yo sé muy bien por qué.”

La Poggina de Gioseffo Guami [7] y La Chremasca de Tarquinio Merula [6] se compusieron más de cincuenta años después de Falt d’argens. Para entonces la canzona se había alejado de su origen vocal. Aunque los arreglos instrumentales de canciones aún se denominaban así, a finales del siglo XVI el término solía referirse a composiciones nuevas adaptadas a las posibilidades técnicas y expresivas de los instrumentos musicales. Una “firma musical” característica de la canzona en el siglo XVI y compartida por Cavazzoni, Merula y Guami es el patrón rítmico largo-corto-corto-largo al comienzo de la pieza. Una de las cuatro partes introduce este ritmo, y las demás lo imitan sucesivamente. Esta manera de empezar tiene sus raíces en las canciones franco-flamencas que sirvieron como modelo para las primeras canzonas.

Plegarias musicales

Cavazzoni, Merula y Guami estuvieron empleados como organistas y sus canzonas probablemente fueron precursoras de la sonata de iglesia (sonata da chiesa) que aparecería algo más tarde. Sin embargo, en la segunda mitad del siglo XVI el núcleo de la música sacra católica consistía en formas vocales como la misa polifónica y el motete. Para expresar la variedad de caracteres del motete italiano a finales del siglo XVI, podemos establecer una analogía con la representación de los ángeles en la pintura sacra de la época. A veces, los ángeles toman la forma de niños de expresión cándida, mientras que en otras ocasiones nos abruman con su poder. Pueden aparecer distantes e intocables, o bien comprender e incluso compartir las emociones de los hombres. La apariencia de los ángeles y su manera de transmitir el mensaje divino influyen enormemente en nuestra percepción de la escena.

En los cuatro motetes incluidos en este disco es el hombre quien se dirige a Dios a través de una oración puesta en música. El imponente Diligam te, Domine [10] de Ascanio Trombetti y O quam suavis est Domine spiritus tuus [8] de Jacopo Corfini están basados en textos del Antiguo Testamento. Ambos son densos, respectivamente a seis y a siete voces, y revelan hasta qué punto los compositores del Norte de Italia asimilaron la técnica contrapuntística de la escuela franco-flamenca, y particularmente de Adrian Willaert y del maestro de Corfini, Giaches Brumel. La monumentalidad de estas dos composiciones es adecuada para invocar solemnemente al todopoderoso Dios Padre y contrasta con Adoramus te Christe [9] del compositor romano Paolo Agostini, un motete mucho más íntimo y transparente. El texto de esta antífona para el Viernes Santo se centra en la naturaleza humana de Cristo y su sufrimiento en la Cruz.

También el motete a seis voces Odecha ki’anitani [15] es una oración que procede de los versículos 21 al 24 del Salmo 118: “Te alabaré porque me has escuchado”. Sin embargo, en esta caso la música no está destinada al culto católico sino al judío: la compilación Hashirim asher lish’lomo (“Las canciones de Salomón”) de Salomone Rossi consiste en versiones polifónicas de salmos y canciones para su uso en la sinagoga, y fue una de las primeras publicaciones en combinar textos en caracteres hebreos con la notación musical moderna.

Aunque el motete es una forma vocal, su interpretación instrumental fue común a lo largo del siglo XVI. Los Piffari del Doge, un grupo de instrumentistas de viento al servicio de la ciudad de Venecia, ya tocaban arreglos instrumentales de motetes antes de 1500. A partir de 1560 muchas catedrales e iglesias de importancia ofrecían empleo estable a instrumentistas de cuerda o viento. Un gran número de publicaciones de música sacra de finales del siglo XVI indican que la música es apropiada para “cantar o tocar en todo tipo de instrumentos”. Entre los compositores más destacados de música vocal se encontraban instrumentistas de viento como Ascanio Trombetti, cuyo apellido procede de la profesión de varios miembros de su familia: trompetistas.

Experimento y extravagancia

Si consideramos el Ricercar del primo tono de Andrea Gabrieli como un modelo de equilibrio y simetría, el Ricercare ottavo [11] de Frescobaldi es su opuesto: uno de los ricercares más excéntricos y experimentales jamás escritos. En su libro de Recercari et canzoni francese de 1615, Frescobaldi basa cada ricercare en un obbligo o regla compositiva diferente. En este caso, la norma es “evitar los grados conjuntos”. En efecto, no hay segundas mayores o menores en ninguna de las cuatro voces, lo que confiere un perfil melódico muy peculiar a este ricercare. Los diversos temas y contratemas aparecen en imitación muy densa, con frecuencia invertidos o ligeramente modificados, hasta el punto de que resulta prácticamente imposible seguirlos.

El Ricercare ottavo de Frescobaldi podría llamarse, en su excentricidad, un capriccio, denominación aplicable a cualquier composición instrumental en que la fantasía, invención y expresión dominan sobre la observación de las normas artísticas tradicionales. Al igual que el Ricercar ottavo de Frescobaldi, cada capriccio se basa en un tema, un carácter o una norma compositiva concreta, frecuentemente expresada en el título. Un ejemplo muy conocido de este tipo de excentricidad en las artes visuales son los retratos pintados por Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1527-1593). Desde lejos parecen figuras humanas, pero una mirada próxima revela una serie de frutas, flores u otros objectos relacionados temáticamente, que se superponen sugiriendo un retrato. Vincenzo Ruffo due el primer compositor que utilizó el término capriccio en una publicación, sus Capricci in musica a tre voci de 1564. Las piezas llevan títulos llamativos, como El travagliato [4], “el atormentado”. El “tormento” podría estar relacionado con la complejidad rítmica y contrapuntística de la composición.

El término capriccio también se ajusta al estilo inventivo y original de la música instrumental de Giovanni Maria Trabaci, compositor napolitano, organista y maestro de capilla de los virreyes españoles. Él mismo utilizó la palabra capriccio para definir su música, por ejemplo en colecciones como el Secondo libro de ricercate & altri varii capricci de 1615. En el prólogo, Trabaci pide a los intérpretes que presten atención al espíritu de la música, y muchos de los títulos, por ejemplo La Galante [18] sugieren un carácter concreto. Las dos gallardas incluidas en esta grabación son particularmente peculiares en su estructura e incluyen secciones en compás binario.

El predecesor de Trabaci en la capilla de los virreyes españoles en Nápoles fue el francés Giovanni de Macque, auto de varias composiciones para tecla con títulos tan sugerentes como Consonanzi stravaganti (“consonancias extravagantes”) o Durezze e ligature (“disonancias y suspensiones”). Podríamos considerar estas piezas como capriccios armónicos que juegan con las expectativas creadas por ciertos pasos cromáticos, progresiones armónicas y giros melódicos, engañando al oyente una y otra vez y evitando cualquier cadencia conclusiva hasta el último compás. Esta fórmula es similar a la del Praeambulum legatura [11] que el musicólogo y editor alemán Franciscus Commer le atribuyó a Girolamo Frescobaldi en 1838. La fuente original, probablemente un manuscrito aún conservado en Berlín en tiempos de Commer, se ha perdido, y los expertos consideran la atribución poco plausible por razones de estilo.

Otro ejemplo de la influencia de la música napolitana fuera del Reino son las dos canzoni alla napolitana de Baldassare Donato y Lodovico Agostini que cierran el programa. Sus raíces se encuentran en las canciones napolitanas llamadas villanesche. Durante las primeras décadas del siglo XVI, muchos campesinos se trasladaron a la ciudad de Nápoles para trabajar en la próspera industria de la lana y la seda. Las primeras colecciones impresas de villanesche se publicaron alrededor de 1530 y muestran la influencia del dialecto y la tradición musical de los campesinos. Poco después, compositores de fuera de Nápoles se interesaron por este género, sobre todo en el Norte de Italia. Adrian Willaert publicó una colección de Canzone villanesche alla napolitana en Venecia en 1545 y muchos otros compositores siguieron su ejemplo. El secreto del éxito de estas canciones reside en su simplicidad: las napolitane ofrecían una alternativa ligera y divertida al madrigal, mucho más complicado y dramático.

Chi la gagliarda, donne, vo’ imparare [20] de Donato es un perfecto ejemplo de la frivolidad de estas canciones: “Quien quiera aprender la gallarda, que acuda a nosotros, que somos buenos profesores, y no cesamos de bailar noche y día”. La poesía de All’arm’ all’arme [21] es algo más sofisticada: el corazón está en guerra con su enemigo, el amor, y trata de defenderse. La irregularidad rítmica de ambas piezas es característica de las napolitane y contribuye a su carácter ligero y juguetón.

María Martínez Ayerza

Información adicional

Estilo

Renacimiento

Interpretación

Flauta

Artista

The Royal Wind Music